mr mr cote

Educational, Investigative, and Absurd Writings by M. R. Côté

Conduit's Commit Index

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As with MozReview, Conduit is being designed to operate on changesets. Since the end result of work on a codebase is a changeset, it makes sense to start the process with one, so all the necessary metadata (author, message, repository, etc.) are provided from the beginning. You can always get a plain diff from a changeset, but you can’t get a changeset from a plain diff.

Similarly, we’re keeping the concept of a logical series of changesets. This encourages splitting up a unit of work into incremental changes, which are easier to review and to test than large patches that do many things at the same time. For more on the benefits of working with small changesets, a few random articles are Ship Small Diffs, Micro Commits, and Large Diffs Are Hurting Your Ability To Ship.

In MozReview, we used the term commit series to refer to a set of one or more changesets that build up to a solution. This term is a bit confusing, since the series itself can have multiple revisions, so you end up with a series of revisions of a series of changesets. For Conduit, we decided to use the term topic instead of commit series, since the commits in a single series are generally related in some way. We’re using the term iteration to refer to each update of a topic. Hence, a solution ends up being one or more iterations on a particular topic. Note that the number of changesets can vary from iteration to iteration in a single topic, if the author decides to either further split up work or to coalesce changesets that are tightly related. Also note that naming is hard, and we’re not completely satisfied with “topic” and “iteration”, so we may change the terminology if we come up with anything better.

As I noted in my last post, we’re working on the push-to-review part of Conduit, the entrance to what we sometimes call the commit pipeline. However, technically “push-to-review” isn’t accurate, as the first process after pushing might be sending changesets to Try for testing, or static analysis to get quick automated feedback on formatting, syntax, or other problems that don’t require a human to look at the code. So instead of review repository, which we’ve used in MozReview, we’re calling it a staging repository in the Conduit world.

Along with the staging repository is the first service we’re building, the commit index. This service holds the metadata that binds changesets in the staging repo to iterations of topics. Eventually, it will also hold information about how changesets moved through the pipeline: where and when they were landed, if and when they were backed out, and when they were uplifted into release branches.

Unfortunately a simple “push” command, whether from Mercurial or from Git, does not provide enough information to update the commit index. The main problem is that not all of the changesets the author specifies for pushing may actually be sent. For example, I have three changesets, A, B, and C, and pushed them up previously. I then update C to make C′ and push again. Despite all three being in the “draft” phase (which is how we differentiate work in progress from changes that have landed in the mainline repository), only C′ will actually be sent to the staging repo, since A and B already exist there.

Thus, we need a Mercurial or Git client extension, or a separate command-line tool, to tell the commit index exactly what changesets are part of the iteration we’re pushing up—in this example, A, B, and C′. When it receives this information, the commit index creates a new topic, if necessary, and a new iteration in that topic, and records the data in a data store. This data will then be used by the review service, to post review requests and provide information on reviews, and by the autoland service, to determine which changesets to transplant.

The biggest open question is how to associate a push with an existing topic. For example, locally I might be working on two bugs at the same time, using two different heads, which map to two different topics. When I make some local changes and push one head up, how does the commit index know which topic to update? Mercurial bookmarks, which are roughly equivalent to Git branch names, are a possibility, but as they are arbitrarily named by the author, collisions are too great a possibility. We need to be sure that each topic is unique.

Another straightforward solution is to use the bug ID, since the vast majority of commits to mozilla-central are associated with a bug in BMO. However, that would restrict Conduit to one topic per bug, requiring new bugs for all follow-up work or work in parallel by multiple developers. In MozReview, we partially worked around this by using an “ircnick” parameter and including that in the commit-series identifiers, and by allowing arbitrary identifiers via the --reviewid option to “hg push”. However this is unintuitive, and it still requires each topic to be associated with a single bug, whereas we would like the flexibility to associate multiple bugs with a single topic. Although we’re still weighing options, likely an intuitive and flexible solution will involve some combination of commit-message annotations and/or inferences, command-line options, and interactive prompts.

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